lightness

lightness
Ⅰ.
light [1] NOUN 1) the natural agent that stimulates sight and makes things visible; electromagnetic radiation from about 390 to 740 nm in wavelength. 2) a source of illumination. 3) a device producing a flame or spark. 4) (lights) traffic lights. 5) an expression in someone's eyes. 6) an area that is brighter or paler than its surroundings. 7) enlightenment. 8) (lights) a person's opinions, standards, and abilities. 9) a window or opening to let light in.
VERB (past lit; past part. lit or lighted) 1) provide with light. 2) ignite or be ignited.
ADJECTIVE 1) having a considerable or sufficient amount of light. 2) (of a colour or object) reflecting a lot of light; pale.
bring (or come) to light — Cf. ↑come to light
in a light — Cf. ↑in a light
in (the) light of — Cf. ↑in the light of
light at the end of the tunnel — Cf. ↑light at the end of the tunnel
the light of day — Cf. ↑the light of day
the light of someone's life — Cf. ↑the light of someone's life
light up — Cf. ↑light up
see the light — Cf. ↑see the light
throw (or cast or shed) light on — Cf. ↑throw light on
DERIVATIVES lightless adjective lightness noun.
ORIGIN Old English.
Ⅱ.
light [2] ADJECTIVE 1) of little weight. 2) deficient in weight. 3) not strongly or heavily built. 4) relatively low in density, amount, or intensity. 5) carrying or suitable for small loads. 6) gentle or delicate. 7) not profound or serious. 8) (of sleep or a sleeper) easily disturbed. 9) easily borne or done. 10) free from worry.
make light of — Cf. ↑make light of
make light work of — Cf. ↑make light work of
travel light — Cf. ↑travel light
DERIVATIVES lightish adjective lightly adverb lightness noun.
ORIGIN Old English.
Ⅲ.
light [3] VERB (past and past part. lit or lighted) 1) (light on/upon) come upon or discover by chance. 2) (light into) N. Amer. informal criticize severely; attack.
ORIGIN Old English, «descend, alight».

English terms dictionary. 2015.

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